Ohio millennials may be less likely to divorce than their baby boomer counterparts, but it remains to be seen whether this will continue as they head into middle age. According to Philip Cohen, the University of Maryland sociologist whose research found an 18% drop in divorce from 2008 to 2016, if millennials stay married in their 40s, they will probably not divorce later.

One reason millennials are less likely to divorce may be that they are getting married later in life. This also means they are more likely to want a prenuptial agreement. Some attorneys say there has been a significant increase in millennials requesting prenups, and they do not have the stigma they once did. However, even without prenups, attorneys report that the divorce process with millennials is very different than with baby boomers. Their comfort with technology means they can quickly access necessary financial information.

The use of dating apps has become so common that it is also easier for people to start meeting others after divorce. People no longer feel as though divorce means they will have to spend their life alone. While divorce remains emotionally difficult for people of any age, there is less sense of finality for millennials.

Millennials and others who are considering ending a marriage may want to consult an attorney to discuss divorce and other family law topics. Divorce is not just about splitting property; if the couple has children, they will need to make a decision about custody and child support. They do not necessarily have to go to litigation for this. They may be able to reach an agreement through negotiation or an alternative dispute resolution method, such as mediation or collaborative divorce. These approaches may cost less and be less time-consuming and stressful than litigation.